Monthly Archives: December 2015

SpaceX successfully landed it’s Falcon 9 rocket after launching it into space

SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk, has landed it’s Falcon 9 rocket after launching it into space. The rocket is part of an attempt to develop a credible relaunch-able platform for sending satellites into space.

 

According to SpaceX’s youtube page:

 

With this mission, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will deliver 11 satellites to low-Earth orbit for ORBCOMM, a leading global provider of Machine-to-Machine communication and Internet of Things solutions. The ORBCOMM launch is targeted for an evening launch from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. If all goes as planned, the 11 satellites will be deployed approximately 20 minutes after liftoff, completing a 17-satellite, low Earth orbit constellation for ORBCOMM. This mission also marks SpaceX’s return-to-flight as well as its first attempt to land a first stage on land. The landing of the first stage is a secondary test objective.”

The youtube video link is given below:
ORBCOMM-2 Full Launch Webcast

 

Finding new employees who support company culture a top concern for businesses expanding abroad, EIU report finds

  • New report identifies “softer” aspects of business expansions, such as sourcing new employees who support and enhance the brand’s existing culture, as a top concern
  • Other findings include the desire to open new markets and gain market share as the main drivers for corporate expansions abroad
  • A location’s level of taxation or skills shortages do not seem to be as much of a concern to companies expanding overseas as might have been expected

A new report released on December 3rd, by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) states that bringing new people into a company’s culture and values is among the biggest challenges during international expansions. Corporate overseas expansion: Opportunities and barriers, sponsored by TMF Group, builds on a survey of 155 senior executives who have knowledge of the issues involved in their company’s expansion into foreign markets.

Among those interviewed for the report there was near-unanimous agreement that maintaining company culture while respecting local customs and cultural differences is a fundamental objective for a successful international expansion. By contrast, policymakers may have overstated the importance of a location’s level of taxation, as this seems to be far less of a concern in companies’ expansion projects than might have been expected.

The survey also finds that a desire to open new markets and gain market share are the principal drivers of corporate expansions abroad, selected by 59% and 57% of respondents respectively. This is especially the case for European countries, as sluggish growth in domestic markets has encouraged many European companies to seek stronger returns overseas. By contrast, the majority of respondents in Asia-Pacific (53%) are particularly driven by the need to find new sources of capital.

Martin Koehring, the editor of the report, said: “It’s clear from our report that once a company’s executive team has identified its scope for an overseas expansion, much of the success will rest on comprehensive planning. This includes ‘softer’ brand-authenticity elements, such as maintaining the company culture and values, that are in some regards more pressing—or perhaps more challenging to master—than ‘harder’ aspects such as currency hedging, integrating operational systems and ensuring compliance with local regulations.”

Read Corporate overseas expansion: Opportunities and barriers here

Source: EIU

Stanford study finds promise in expanding renewables based on results in three major economies

A new Stanford study found that renewable energy can make a major and increasingly cost-effective contribution to alleviating climate change.

BY TERRY NAGEL


Stanford energy experts have released a study that compares the experiences of three large economies in ramping up renewable energy deployment and concludes that renewables can make a major and increasingly cost-effective contribution to climate change mitigation.

The report from Stanford’s Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance analyzes the experiences of Germany, California and Texas, the world’s fourth, eighth and 12th largest economies, respectively. It found, among other things, that Germany, which gets about half as much sunshine as California and Texas, nevertheless generates electricity from solar installations at a cost comparable to that of Texas and only slightly higher than in California.

The report was released in time for the United Nations Climate Change Conference that started this week, where international leaders are gathering to discuss strategies to deal with global warming, including massive scale-ups of renewable energy.

“As policymakers from around the world gather for the climate negotiations in Paris, our report draws on the experiences of three leaders in renewable-energy deployment to shed light on some of the most prominent and controversial themes in the global renewables debate,” said Dan Reicher, executive director of the Steyer-Taylor Center, which is a joint center between Stanford Law School and Stanford Graduate School of Business. Reicher also is interim president and chief executive officer of the American Council on Renewable Energy.

“Our findings suggest that renewable energy has entered the mainstream and is ready to play a leading role in mitigating global climate change,” said Felix Mormann, associate professor of law at the University of Miami, faculty fellow at the Steyer-Taylor Center and lead author of the report.

Other conclusions of the report, “A Tale of Three Markets: Comparing the Solar and Wind Deployment Experiences of California, Texas, and Germany,” include:

  • Germany’s success in deploying renewable energy at scale is due largely to favorable treatment of “soft cost” factors such as financing, permitting, installation and grid access. This approach has allowed the renewable energy policies of some countries to deliver up to four times the average deployment of other countries, despite offering only half the financial incentives.
  • Contrary to widespread concern, a higher share of renewables does not automatically translate to higher electricity bills for ratepayers. While Germany’s residential electric rates are two to three times those of California and Texas, this price differential is only partly due to Germany’s subsidies for renewables. The average German household’s electricity bill is, in fact, lower than in Texas and only slightly higher than in California, partly as a result of energy-efficiency efforts in German homes.
  • An increase in the share of intermittent solar and wind power need not jeopardize the stability of the electric grid. From 2006 to 2013, Germany tripled the amount of electricity generated from solar and wind to a market share of 26 percent, while managing to reduce average annual outage times for electricity customers in its grid from an already impressive 22 minutes to just 15 minutes. During that same period, California tripled the amount of electricity produced from solar and wind to a joint market share of 8 percent and reduced its outage times from more than 100 minutes to less than 90 minutes. However, Texas increased its outage times from 92 minutes to 128 minutes after ramping up its wind-generated electricity sixfold to a market share of 10 percent.

The study may inform the energy debate in the United States, where expanding the nation’s renewable energy infrastructure is a top priority of the Obama administration and the subject of debate among presidential candidates.

The current share of renewables in U.S. electricity generation is 14 percent – half that of Germany. Germany’s ambitious – and controversial – Energiewende (Energy Transition) initiative commits the country to meeting 80 percent of its electricity needs with renewables by 2050. In the United States, 29 states, including California and Texas, have set mandatory targets for renewable energy.

In California, Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed legislation committing the state to producing 50 percent of its electricity from renewables by 2030. Texas, the leading U.S. state for wind development, set a mandate of 10,000 megawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2025, but reached this target 15 years ahead of schedule and now generates over 10 percent of the state’s electricity from wind alone.

Source: Sanford News