Tag Archives: politics

Science, politics, news agenda and our priorities

By Syed Faisal ur Rahman


 

Recent postponement of the first Organization of Islamic Countries (OIC) summit on Science and Technology and COMSTECH 15th general assembly meeting, by the government of Pakistan due to security reasons tells a lot about our national priorities.

The summit was first of its kind meeting of the heads of state and dignitaries from the Muslim world on the issue of science and technology.

Today most Muslim countries are known in other parts of the world as backward, narrow minded and violent regions. Recent wars in the Middle East, sectarian rifts and totalitarian regimes are also not presenting a great picture either. While rest of the world is sending probes towards the edge of our solar system, sending missions to Mars and exploring moons of Saturn, we are busy and failing in finding moon on the right dates of the Islamic calendar.

Any average person can figure out that we need something drastic to change this situation. This summit was exactly the kind of step we needed for a jump start. Some serious efforts were made by the COMSTECH staff under the leadership of Dr. Shaukat Hameed Khan and even the secretary general of OIC was pushing hard for the summit. According to reports, OIC secretary general personally visited more than a dozen OIC member countries to successfully convince their head of states to attend the summit.

This summit would have also provided an opportunity to bring harmony and peace in the Muslim world as many Muslim countries are at odds with each other on regional issues like in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Afghanistan.

Last century saw enormous developments in the fields of fundamental science, which also helped countries to rapidly develop their potential in industry, medical sciences, defense, space and many other sectors. Countries which made science and technology research and education as priority areas emerged as stronger nations as compared to those who merely relied on agriculture and the abundance of natural resources. We are now living in an era where humanity is reaching to the end points of our solar system through probes like Voyager 1, sent decades ago by NASA with messages from our civilization; Quantum computing is well on its way to become a reality; Humanity is also endeavoring to colonize other planets through multi-national projects; We are also looking deepest into the space for new stars, galaxies and even to some of the earliest times after the creation of our universe through cosmic microwave background probes like Planck.

Unfortunately, in Pakistan, anti-science and anti-research attitudes are getting stronger. The lack of anti-science and anti-research attitude is not just limited to the religious zealots but the so called liberals of Pakistan do not simply put much heed to what is going around in the world of science.

If you are one of the regular followers of political arena, daily news coverage on the media and keep your ears open to hear what is going around in the country then you can easily get the idea what are our priorities as a nation. How many talk shows we saw on the main stream media over the cancellation of the summit? How many questions were raised in the parliament?

The absence or very unnoticeable presence of such issues is conspicuous and apart from one senator, Senator Sehar Kamran, who wrote a piece in a news paper, no politician even bothered to raise the relevant questions.

Forget about main stream media or politicians. If we go to social media or drawing room discussions, did you hear anyone discussing the issue in a debate when we make  fuss about issues like what kind of dress some xyz model was wearing on her court hearing in a money laundering case or which politician’s marriage is supposedly in trouble or whose hand Junaid Jamshed was holding in group photo?

We boast about our success in reducing terrorism through successful military operations and use that success to attract investors, sports teams and tourists but on the other hand we are using security concerns as an excuse to cancel an important summit on the development of science and technology. This shows that either we are confused or hypocrites or we are simply not ready for any kind of intellectual growth.

There is a need to seriously do some brain storming and soul searching about our priorities.  One thing which I have learned as a student of Astronomy is that we are insignificant as compared to the vastness of our universe, the only thing which can make us somewhat special as compared to other species on earth or a lifeless rock on Pluto is that we can challenge our thinking ability to learn, to explore and to discover. Unfortunately, in our country we are losing this special capacity day by day.

New research shows how to make effective political arguments, Stanford sociologist says

Stanford sociologist Robb Willer finds that an effective way to persuade people in politics is to reframe arguments to appeal to the moral values of those holding opposing positions.

BY CLIFTON B. PARKER


In today’s American politics, it might seem impossible to craft effective political messages that reach across the aisle on hot-button issues like same-sex marriage, national health insurance and military spending. But, based on new research by Stanford sociologist Robb Willer, there’s a way to craft messages that could lead to politicians finding common ground.

“We found the most effective arguments are ones in which you find a new way to connect a political position to your target audience’s moral values,” Willer said.

While most people’s natural inclination is to make political arguments grounded in their own moral values, Willer said, these arguments are less persuasive than “reframed” moral arguments.

To be persuasive, reframe political arguments to appeal to the moral values of those holding the opposing political positions, said Matthew Feinberg, assistant professor of organizational behavior at the University of Toronto, who co-authored the study with Willer. Their work was published recently online in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Such reframed moral appeals are persuasive because they increase the apparent agreement between a political position and the target audience’s moral values, according to the research, Feinberg said.

In fact, Willer pointed out, the research shows a “potential effective path for building popular support in our highly polarized political world.” Creating bipartisan success on legislative issues – whether in Congress or in state legislatures – requires such a sophisticated approach to building coalitions among groups not always in agreement with each other, he added.

Different moral values

Feinberg and Willer drew upon past research showing that American liberals and conservatives tend to endorse different moral values to different extents. For example, liberals tend to be more concerned with care and equality where conservatives are more concerned with values like group loyalty, respect for authority and purity.

They then conducted four studies testing the idea that moral arguments reframed to fit a target audience’s moral values could be persuasive on even deeply entrenched political issues. In one study, conservative participants recruited via the Internet were presented with passages that supported legalizing same-sex marriage.

Conservative participants were ultimately persuaded by a patriotism-based argument that “same-sex couples are proud and patriotic Americans … [who] contribute to the American economy and society.”

On the other hand, they were significantly less persuaded by a passage that argued for legalized same-sex marriage in terms of fairness and equality.

Feinberg and Willer found similar results for studies targeting conservatives with a pro-national health insurance message and liberals with arguments for high levels of military spending and making English the official language of the United States. In all cases, messages were significantly more persuasive when they fit the values endorsed more by the target audience.

“Morality can be a source of political division, a barrier to building bi-partisan support for policies,” Willer said. “But it can also be a bridge if you can connect your position to your audience’s deeply held moral convictions.”

Values and framing messages

“Moral reframing is not intuitive to people,” Willer said. “When asked to make moral political arguments, people tend to make the ones they believe in and not that of an opposing audience – but the research finds this type of argument unpersuasive.”

To test this, the researchers conducted two additional studies examining the moral arguments people typically make. They asked a panel of self-reported liberals to make arguments that would convince a conservative to support same-sex marriage, and a panel of conservatives to convince liberals to support English being the official language of the United States.

They found that, in both studies, most participants crafted messages with significant moral content, and most of that moral content reflected their own moral values, precisely the sort of arguments their other studies showed were ineffective.

“Our natural tendency is to make political arguments in terms of our own morality,” Feinberg said. “But the most effective arguments are based on the values of whomever you are trying to persuade.”

In all, Willer and Feinberg conducted six online studies involving 1,322 participants.

Source: Stanford News